Healthcare

Phase 2 Migraine Surgery


At the end of February, I wrote about my upcoming nerve decompression surgery. Within that post, there was a promise that I would keep everyone updated. Here it is.

Yesterday was exactly five weeks post-op! The time has gone by so fast, and at the same time has crept by while dealing with pain and the recovery period. After the initial shock had faded away about having two stunning black eyes, I had to keep pinching myself. There was no way that this could be reality. When I went in for surgery, I had a whopping migraine and when I came out; nothing! Of course, the surgical pain was not an enjoyable experience but none of it was migraines.

I have been 100% migraine free for five entire weeks. My hope for the surgery was that the migraines would be less frequent and severe. That would have been a win in my book. This is like a slam dunk! I’m still superstitious that it’s too good to be true but maybe it isn’t. Maybe my leap of faith worked. In the meantime, I am keeping my fingers and toes crossed as well as knocking on wood.

The reason that I sought a surgical consult in the first place was for my occipital neuralgia. If you aren’t familiar with this condition, then you are in luck. I have a little “101 lesson” for you!

Symptoms include continuous aching, burning and throbbing, with intermittent shocking or shooting pain. The pain often is described as migraine-like and some patients experience other symptoms common to migraines and cluster headaches. The pain usually originates at the base of the skull and radiates near the back or along the side of the scalp. Some patients experience pain behind the eye on the affected side. The pain is felt most often on one side of the head but may also affect both sides of the head. Neck movements may trigger pain in some patients. The scalp may be tender to the touch, and an activity like brushing the hair may increase a person’s pain.

American Association of Neurological Surgeons: Occipital Neuralgia

While there have been no migraines, the occipital neuralgia has continued to be a nuisance. Until you have experienced laying your head on a pillow and having extreme pain or have combed your hair and cried because it hurt so bad, there is simply no way to describe the intensity.

Thus, phase two of my lovely surgeries. On Monday, I will be having nerve decompression done on my occipital nerves. The incision will be on the back of my head and four nerves will be worked on in total. Fat will pad each nerve so that scar tissue doesn’t cause problems in the future. There will also be some muscles that are resected in my neck. It will be another big surgery to recover from.

The results of the last surgery leave me feeling hopeful that this will also be a success. Quality of life is so important, and pain has such a massive effect on every aspect of our life. So, on a wing and a prayer, here I go again with a leap of faith. On Monday, if you think of it, say a little prayer.

…and yes, I’ll keep updating everyone!

OR

1 thought on “Phase 2 Migraine Surgery”

  1. Reblogged this on Rising Inside the Embers and commented:
    Hi Friends!
    This Friday, I am doing something a little different. I am sharing this blog entry from one of my favorite people ever. One of our most recent bonding experiences has been over the discussion of occipital neuralgia. This is another diagnosis we have in common, although my diagnosis is more recent. Recent, as in only three days in. I am a proud recipient of my first nerve block, which has made a world of difference in the quality of my life. At the same time, I am so afraid of getting my hopes up, just to have them dashed. As I was told recently, the road to recovery is not linear. There will be times where I make progress and times where I experience a setback. It is not exactly how I want things to go, but it is better than not experiencing progress at all.
    I am going to wrap this up, so I can return to icing my head. I hope you enjoy this post and give Autonomic RN a follow.
    XOXO!
    Rie

    Like

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