Take a hike migraine!

Twelve days and counting. That’s how long I’ve had my current migraine. Yes, twelve days and no, that isn’t a personal record either. I just realized this morning that the only time I’ve seen the light in the last couple weeks has been if I have had an appointment. Otherwise the blinds have all been closed as a constant pain has its grips on me.

For millions of Americans and even more on an international level, chronic migraines represent a very disabling medical condition. If you haven’t ever had one, then consider yourself among the lucky. Take the worst possible headache that you have ever had and amplify it by at least twenty times. Then add in light, noise, taste, and smelling sensitivities along with the intense desire to throw up. Mull it into a lovely mixture and that is just a tiny glimpse of what many of us face multiple times a month, sometimes daily.

My migraine journey began when I was eighteen. It made me so sick and I didn’t have the slightest clue what it was. If only that ignorance could have continued a little longer. Before I knew it, we were trying prophylactic medications like they were candy. One wouldn’t work so we would move onto the next class of drugs. Nope, cross off another one, yes that one too. In less than three years we had exhausted the prophylactic realm as well as abortive medications.

Going through college with migraines was an absolute nightmare. If nursing school wasn’t enough stress, this added another element. Numerous trips to the Emergency Room for rescue medications and never being able to get them to just go away FOREVER.

Fourteen years have passed since I received the dreaded migraine diagnosis and I can’t even count how many times I have been hospitalized, many of which were for a week at a time. Ten years have included receiving Botox injections, which is becoming much more common. However, my dose and frequency has maxed out, leaving me with nowhere to turn if things ever quit working. Every ten weeks I have been getting 25 injections for one round of Botox. Don’t get me wrong, that was like night and day. It took me from three to four migraines a week, down to three or four bigger migraines in three months, in addition to a few smaller ones.

For me the Botox was nothing short of miraculous once I received approval. However, enter in autonomic dysfunction and the whole picture changed again. Three years ago, I started developing occipital neuralgia and the only treatment that really helped that was nerve blocks. So, my schedule became Botox every ten weeks and nerve blocks every twelve weeks. My addition skills haven’t diminished through everything. Let me tell you, that is a LOT of poking and prodding on your head. My multiple pulmonary emboli┬álast spring made it so that nobody would do nerve blocks anymore.

I already had been doing research for several years about migraine surgery and had kept pushing it to the back of my mind, thinking that if things ever got extreme that it was something that I was informed about. Last summer after my neurologist had quit looking for other options of treating my occipital neuralgia, I went back to work trying to figure out what could be done. My migraines were being directly impacted by this.

The first thing that came to mind was the surgery that I had put into my file a few years before. After a consult with one of the plastic surgeons who performs the procedure, the planning started. He said that I was a good candidate. The BIGGEST part was that I couldn’t have any Botox or nerve blocks for five months! I almost choked when he said it, but I knew that we were at a point that we needed to try something. I had initially just gone in for a consult for the occipital pain and we determined that we needed to do more. Everything has risks, and this does too, but I feel like there is a glimmer of hope to get at least some quality of life back. If we accomplish that, then this surgery is a win.

I saw my autonomic specialist last week and was updating him regarding having the procedure. His eyes lit up immediately. He said he was very excited to see if any of my autonomic issues will settle down some. I also was thinking the same thing. Everything is so hypersensitive, so if we can perhaps dial back the migraines, maybe other symptoms will mellow a little.

The possibility exists that there could be a complete stop to the migraine. However, that isn’t something that I’m expecting. If we can decrease the severity and frequency, then we have made a difference. Perhaps being able to stop the Botox at some point would be conceivable, but even decreasing dosing and frequency would be nice things. We don’t know how this will turn out.

Now that I’ve told you my story, I’ll start filling you in on the procedure(s). My case will be a two-phase surgery. The first one is on Wednesday, Feb 21! This week!!! The second one will be April 9. Don’t worry, I will do updated blogs as the healing and recovery process go on, so that you can all stay in the loop and see how this works.

Even though everyone has been calling this “migraine surgery” technically it is nerve decompression surgery. There are many websites with information, but Cleveland Clinic is where the procedure was investigated and developed. This was after they were having patients come back after cosmetic procedures saying that their migraines were gone.

There is a great blog that describes the process. I’m going to link to that so that we aren’t reinventing the wheel with blogs :). Without further ado…Migraine: Choosing Surgical Nerve Decompression Candidates. I will make mention, that my procedures will include doing fat grafting around the nerves that are decompressed so that scar tissue doesn’t build up and compress them again. Much of the research that I’ve done hasn’t mentioned that element. Also of note is that there are a limited number of plastic surgeons who do the procedure nationwide.

Other nerve decompression resources: